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Bee Kind

Provide flowering plants from early spring until late autumn and winter. Choose plants with long flowering times, and keep them flowering by
‘deadheading’ as flowers die.
Grow plants with different shaped flowers. Some
bumblebees have short tongues, suitable for things like apple blossom, whilst those with long tongues can forage on deeper,
tube-shaped flowers such as
foxgloves.
Plant flowers in clumps or clusters of the same type if you have space.
This saves the bumblebees
energy in getting from flower to flower quickly.
‘GARDENING FOR BUMBLEBEES: GETTING STARTED’
gives you a simple introduction to how you can make your outdoor space more bumblebee-friendly, whether you have a large garden with flower beds, a patio or balcony with containers, or just a window box.

https://www.bumblebeeconservation.org/beethechange/resource/read-our-handy-gardening-guide/
COMFREY
YARROW
COMMON THYME
(SYMPHYTUM OFFICINALE)
(ACHILLEA MILLEFOLIUM)
(THYMUS VULGARIS)
Known for its skinhealing properties, Comfrey also contains constituents that soften and calm skin.
The volatile oils and
flavonoids in this frondy
beauty are antispasmodic
and anti-inflammatory
for the digestive system.
Drink it as a tea, or take
it as a tincture.
Thyme contains volatile
oils, which are super
lung-friendly, helping to
thin mucus and relax the
airways so that hacking
coughs are eased. It lasts
well into the winter, so
add it to cold weather
dishes to love your lungs.
Discover how bee-friendly your garden is and learn how to
improve it with planting recommendations tailored to your
garden’s growing conditions, using this handy tool brought to
you by the bumblebee conservation trust’s bee experts.
beekind.Bumblebeeconservation.Org/
To contact the Bumblebee Conservation
Trust for more information on their work,
and more tips for your garden,
email
enquiries@bumblebeeconservation.org,
or telephone 01786 594128.
During 2022,
A.Vogel will be donating
50p from each sale of
Pollinosan Hayfever Eye
Drops to the Bumblebee
Conservation Trust.
BUMBLEBEES ARE LOVEABLE AND HARD-WORKING INSECTS
THAT PROVIDE A VITAL POLLINATING ROLE, BUT THEIR
NUMBERS ARE IN DECLINE. THE IMPORTANCE OF GARDENS
AS BUMBLEBEE HAVENS IS MORE SIGNIFICANT THAN EVER.
THE GOOD NEWS IS YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE AN EXPERT
GARDENER TO HELP BEES: YOU DON’T EVEN HAVE TO HAVE
A GARDEN! A WINDOW-BOX, BALCONY OR HANGING
BASKET WILL DO.
YOU MAY FIND THE GARDEN THE LAST PLACE YOU WANT TO BE
WHEN YOUR HAYFEVER IS RAMPANT. HOWEVER, THE KIND OF
POLLENS THAT ARE DISTRIBUTED ON THE BREEZE, AND DELIVERED
STRAIGHT TO YOUR EYES, ARE PARTICULARLY FINE. THOSE PLANTS
THAT RELY ON POLLINATORS HAVE HEAVIER, STICKIER POLLEN
THAT IS LESS ABLE TO WAFT AROUND IN THE AIR. THE PLANTS
THAT ARE GOOD FOR THE BEES ARE THEREFORE LIKELY TO BE LESS
IRRITATING FOR YOUR EYES AND NOSE. DOUBLE GOODNESS!
MARIGOLD
(CALENDULA OFFICINALIS)
Well-appreciated as a
companion plant, able
to distract bugs from
other, more delicate
plants, Calendula is also
useful for cleansing
the lymphatic system,
helping with conditions
such as congested acne.
CONEFLOWER
ECHINACEA PURPUREA)
The glorious purple
coneflower not only
adds distinction to any
garden, but the bees
adore it and cluster
thickly on organically
grown flower heads.
NASTURTIUM
(TROPAEDUM MAJUS)
Tumbling beautifully over garden beds and walls, Nasturtium flowers are full of peppery flavours that tingle on the palate and strengthen the lungs.
They are also a bountiful
source of vitamin C.
ST. JOHN’S WORT
(HYPERICUM PERFORATUM)
Famed for its sunny
character, cheering an
autumnal garden, this
plant provides both
flowers for supporting
low mood, and oil for
easing painful skin.
Provide flowering plants from early spring until late autumn and winter. Choose plants with long flowering times, and keep them flowering by
‘deadheading’ as flowers die.
Grow plants with different shaped flowers. Some
bumblebees have short tongues, suitable for things like apple blossom, whilst those with long tongues can forage on deeper,
tube-shaped flowers such as
foxgloves.
‘GARDENING FOR BUMBLEBEES: GETTING STARTED’
gives you a simple introduction to how you can make your outdoor space more bumblebee-friendly, whether you have a large garden with flower beds, a patio or balcony with containers, or just a window box.

https://www.bumblebeeconservation.org/beethechange/resource/read-our-handy-gardening-guide/
COMFREY
YARROW
COMMON THYME
(SYMPHYTUM OFFICINALE)
(ACHILLEA MILLEFOLIUM)
(THYMUS VULGARIS)
Known for its skinhealing properties, Comfrey also contains constituents that soften and calm skin.
The volatile oils and
flavonoids in this frondy
beauty are antispasmodic
and anti-inflammatory
for the digestive system.
Drink it as a tea, or take
it as a tincture.
Thyme contains volatile
oils, which are super
lung-friendly, helping to
thin mucus and relax the
airways so that hacking
coughs are eased. It lasts
well into the winter, so
add it to cold weather
dishes to love your lungs.
Discover how bee-friendly your garden is and learn how to
improve it with planting recommendations tailored to your
garden’s growing conditions, using this handy tool brought to
you by the bumblebee conservation trust’s bee experts.
beekind.Bumblebeeconservation.Org/
To contact the Bumblebee Conservation
Trust for more information on their work,
and more tips for your garden,
email
enquiries@bumblebeeconservation.org,
or telephone 01786 594128.
During 2022,
A.Vogel will be donating
50p from each sale of
Pollinosan Hayfever Eye
Drops to the Bumblebee
Conservation Trust.
BUMBLEBEES ARE LOVEABLE AND HARD-WORKING INSECTS THAT PROVIDE A VITAL POLLINATING ROLE, BUT THEIR NUMBERS ARE IN DECLINE. THE IMPORTANCE OF GARDENS AS BUMBLEBEE HAVENS IS MORE SIGNIFICANT THAN EVER.
THE GOOD NEWS IS YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE AN EXPERT GARDENER TO HELP BEES: YOU DON’T EVEN HAVE TO HAVE A GARDEN! A WINDOW-BOX, BALCONY OR HANGING BASKET WILL DO.
YOU MAY FIND THE GARDEN THE LAST PLACE YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOUR HAYFEVER IS RAMPANT. HOWEVER, THE KIND OF POLLENS THAT ARE DISTRIBUTED ON THE BREEZE, AND DELIVERED
STRAIGHT TO YOUR EYES, ARE PARTICULARLY FINE. THOSE PLANTS THAT RELY ON POLLINATORS HAVE HEAVIER, STICKIER POLLEN
THAT IS LESS ABLE TO WAFT AROUND IN THE AIR. THE PLANTS THAT ARE GOOD FOR THE BEES ARE THEREFORE LIKELY TO BE LESS IRRITATING FOR YOUR EYES AND NOSE. DOUBLE GOODNESS!
MARIGOLD
(CALENDULA OFFICINALIS)
Well-appreciated as a
companion plant, able
to distract bugs from
other, more delicate
plants, Calendula is also
useful for cleansing
the lymphatic system,
helping with conditions
such as congested acne.
CONEFLOWER
ECHINACEA PURPUREA)
The glorious purple
coneflower not only
adds distinction to any
garden, but the bees
adore it and cluster
thickly on organically
grown flower heads.
ST. JOHN’S WORT
(HYPERICUM PERFORATUM)
Famed for its sunny
character, cheering an
autumnal garden, this
plant provides both
flowers for supporting
low mood, and oil for
easing painful skin.
Plant flowers in clumps or clusters of the same type if you have space.
This saves the bumblebees
energy in getting from flower to flower quickly.
NASTURTIUM
(TROPAEDUM MAJUS)
Tumbling beautifully over garden beds and walls, Nasturtium flowers are full of peppery flavours that tingle on the palate and strengthen the lungs.
They are also a bountiful
source of vitamin C.
BUMBLEBEES ARE LOVEABLE AND HARD-WORKING INSECTS THAT PROVIDE A VITAL POLLINATING ROLE, BUT THEIR NUMBERS ARE IN DECLINE. THE IMPORTANCE OF GARDENS AS BUMBLEBEE HAVENS IS MORE SIGNIFICANT THAN EVER. THE GOOD NEWS IS YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE AN EXPERT
GARDENER TO HELP BEES: YOU DON’T EVEN HAVE TO HAVE A GARDEN! A WINDOW-BOX, BALCONY OR HANGING BASKET WILL DO.
YOU MAY FIND THE GARDEN THE LAST PLACE YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOUR HAYFEVER IS RAMPANT. HOWEVER, THE KIND OF POLLENS THAT ARE DISTRIBUTED ON THE BREEZE, AND DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR EYES, ARE PARTICULARLY FINE. THOSE PLANTS THAT RELY ON POLLINATORS HAVE HEAVIER, STICKIER POLLEN THAT IS LESS ABLE TO WAFT AROUND IN THE AIR. THE PLANTS THAT ARE GOOD FOR THE BEES ARE THEREFORE LIKELY TO BE LESS
IRRITATING FOR YOUR EYES AND NOSE. DOUBLE GOODNESS!
‘GARDENING FOR BUMBLEBEES: GETTING STARTED’
gives you a simple introduction to how you can make your outdoor space more bumblebee-friendly, whether you have a large garden with flower beds, a patio or balcony with containers, or just a window box.

https://www.bumblebeeconservation.org/beethechange/resource/read-our-handy-gardening-guide/
Provide flowering plants from early spring until late autumn and winter. Choose plants with long flowering times, and keep them flowering by
‘deadheading’ as flowers die.
Grow plants with different shaped flowers. Some
bumblebees have short tongues, suitable for things like apple blossom, whilst those with long tongues can forage on deeper,
tube-shaped flowers such as
foxgloves.
Plant flowers in clumps or clusters of the same type if you have space.
This saves the bumblebees
energy in getting from flower to flower quickly.
COMFREY
COMMON THYME
(SYMPHYTUM OFFICINALE)
(THYMUS VULGARIS)
Known for its skinhealing properties, Comfrey also contains constituents that soften and calm skin.
Thyme contains volatile
oils, which are super
lung-friendly, helping to
thin mucus and relax the
airways so that hacking
coughs are eased. It lasts
well into the winter, so
add it to cold weather
dishes to love your lungs.
ST. JOHN’S WORT
(HYPERICUM PERFORATUM)
Famed for its sunny
character, cheering an
autumnal garden, this
plant provides both
flowers for supporting
low mood, and oil for
easing painful skin.
Discover how bee-friendly your garden is and learn how to
improve it with planting recommendations tailored to your
garden’s growing conditions, using this handy tool brought to
you by the bumblebee conservation trust’s bee experts.
beekind.Bumblebeeconservation.Org/
To contact the Bumblebee Conservation Trust for more information on their work, and more tips for your garden, email enquiries@bumblebeeconservation.org, or telephone 01786 594128.
During 2022,
A.Vogel will be donating
50p from each sale of
Pollinosan Hayfever Eye
Drops to the Bumblebee
Conservation Trust.
YARROW
(ACHILLEA MILLEFOLIUM)
The volatile oils and
flavonoids in this frondy
beauty are antispasmodic
and anti-inflammatory
for the digestive system.
Drink it as a tea, or take
it as a tincture.
MARIGOLD
(CALENDULA OFFICINALIS)
Well-appreciated as a
companion plant, able
to distract bugs from
other, more delicate
plants, Calendula is also
useful for cleansing
the lymphatic system,
helping with conditions
such as congested acne.
CONEFLOWER
ECHINACEA PURPUREA)
The glorious purple
coneflower not only
adds distinction to any
garden, but the bees
adore it and cluster
thickly on organically
grown flower heads.
NASTURTIUM
(TROPAEDUM MAJUS)
Tumbling beautifully over garden beds and walls, Nasturtium flowers are full of peppery flavours that tingle on the palate and strengthen the lungs.
They are also a bountiful
source of vitamin C.
BUMBLEBEES ARE LOVEABLE AND HARD-WORKING INSECTS
THAT PROVIDE A VITAL POLLINATING ROLE, BUT THEIR
NUMBERS ARE IN DECLINE. THE IMPORTANCE OF GARDENS
AS BUMBLEBEE HAVENS IS MORE SIGNIFICANT THAN EVER.
THE GOOD NEWS IS YOU DON’T HAVE TO BE AN EXPERT
GARDENER TO HELP BEES: YOU DON’T EVEN HAVE TO HAVE
A GARDEN! A WINDOW-BOX, BALCONY OR HANGING
BASKET WILL DO.
YOU MAY FIND THE GARDEN THE LAST PLACE YOU WANT TO BE
WHEN YOUR HAYFEVER IS RAMPANT. HOWEVER, THE KIND OF POLLENS THAT ARE DISTRIBUTED ON THE BREEZE, AND DELIVERED STRAIGHT TO YOUR EYES, ARE PARTICULARLY FINE. THOSE PLANTS THAT RELY ON POLLINATORS HAVE HEAVIER, STICKIER POLLEN THAT IS LESS ABLE TO WAFT AROUND IN THE AIR. THE PLANTS THAT ARE GOOD FOR THE BEES ARE THEREFORE LIKELY TO BE LESS
IRRITATING FOR YOUR EYES AND NOSE. DOUBLE GOODNESS!
‘GARDENING FOR BUMBLEBEES:
GETTING STARTED’
gives you a simple introduction to how you can make your outdoor space more bumblebee-friendly, whether you have a large garden with flower beds, a patio or balcony with containers, or just a window box.
https://www.bumblebeeconservation.org/beethechange/resource/read-our-handy-gardening-guide/
Provide flowering plants from early spring until late autumn and winter. Choose plants with long flowering times, and keep them flowering by
‘deadheading’ as flowers die.
Grow plants with different shaped flowers. Some bumblebees have short tongues, suitable for things like apple blossom, whilst those with long tongues can forage on deeper,
tube-shaped flowers such as
foxgloves.
Plant flowers in clumps or clusters of the same type if you have space.
This saves the bumblebees
energy in getting from flower to flower quickly.
COMFREY
(SYMPHYTUM OFFICINALE)
Known for its skinhealing properties, Comfrey also contains constituents that soften and calm skin.
COMMON THYME
(THYMUS VULGARIS)
Thyme contains volatile
oils, which are super
lung-friendly, helping to
thin mucus and relax the
airways so that hacking
coughs are eased. It lasts
well into the winter, so
add it to cold weather
dishes to love your lungs.
ST. JOHN’S WORT
(HYPERICUM PERFORATUM)
Famed for its sunny
character, cheering an
autumnal garden, this
plant provides both
flowers for supporting
low mood, and oil for
easing painful skin.
YARROW
(ACHILLEA MILLEFOLIUM)
The volatile oils and
flavonoids in this frondy
beauty are antispasmodic
and anti-inflammatory
for the digestive system.
Drink it as a tea, or take
it as a tincture.
MARIGOLD
(CALENDULA OFFICINALIS)
Well-appreciated as a
companion plant, able
to distract bugs from
other, more delicate
plants, Calendula is also
useful for cleansing
the lymphatic system,
helping with conditions
such as congested acne.
CONEFLOWER
ECHINACEA PURPUREA)
The glorious purple
coneflower not only
adds distinction to any
garden, but the bees
adore it and cluster
thickly on organically
grown flower heads.
NASTURTIUM
(TROPAEDUM MAJUS)
Tumbling beautifully over garden beds and walls, Nasturtium flowers are full of peppery flavours that tingle on the palate and
strengthen the lungs.
They are also a bountiful
source of vitamin C.
Discover how bee-friendly your garden is and learn how to improve it with planting recommendations tailored to your garden’s growing conditions, using this handy tool brought to you by the bumblebee conservation trust’s bee experts.
beekind.Bumblebeeconservation.Org/

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