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Inflammation

INFLAMMATION
CAN YOU HAVE TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING?
Inflammation and your immune response are all wrapped up together, indivisible really. We tend to think of
inflammation as the unacceptable side of injury or infection and often seek to dampen it but, without inflammation, your body wouldn’t know where to send immune cells and nor would they get into the area of distress anywhere near as easily. Inflammation serves as a pointer, a distress call, opens up blood vessels for increased blood flow and causes blood vessels to become leaky, so those immune cells can get into the tissues and do their thing.
ACUTE, CHRONIC, AUTOIMMUNE AND LOW-GRADE
Acute inflammation is that which comes and goes. It means you’re good at creating a reaction and then calming down when there’s nothing to worry about any more. However, some of us don’t calm down easily and remain agitated when we don’t need to be. As with unhealthy behaviour, too much anger is damaging, destructive and dangerous. We all know someone who’s like that on the outside! Similarly, inside the body, unregulated inflammation can destroy our own tissues, as with an autoimmune disease.

Some of us just simmer under the surface and that isn’t healthy either. It’s usually better to get it all out and be done with it; but some of us aren’t like that.
TRIGGERS
Aside from bacteria, viruses and injury, there are many other triggers for inflammation. High sugar or alcohol intake, inadequate sleep, and chemical irritants can be responsible for chronic and sometimes damaging inflammation in particular organs, or across the whole system. We can sometimes see symptoms worsen according to the level of stress we experience, or during hormonal changes.
Too much abdominal fat
High sugar diet
Dehydration
Stress and worry
Poor sleep
Excessive exercise
Too much alcohol
SIGNS OF CHRONIC INFLAMMATION
There are some quite serious diseases that are heavily associated with the tissue damage done by chronic inflammation. These include non-alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s, bowel disease and even cancer. However, there are more ‘everyday’ examples too, such as rheumatoid arthritis, diarrhoea, gout, mouth sores, eczema, psoriasis and allergies.
DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE CHANGES THAT HELP
Some of the substances that lead to inflammation are made from fats in the diet. Therefore, it makes
sense to reduce the supply of those fats. Top of the list is one called Arachidonic Acid, which is found in meat and dairy products.
HERBS THAT HELP
Herbs that are regarded as beneficial for inflammation often work in a less targeted way than their medicinal counterparts. This doesn’t sound like good news, but it is. Modern drugs are so good at targeting particular inflammatory pathways that they can shut them down too well, raising the potential for side effects such as tummy bleeds and vascular damage. This is because some substances that create inflammation are protective to other parts of the body. It’s a bit like a teacher shouting aggressively at one child when the whole class is being disruptive.

Devil’s Claw and Arnica are two examples of herbs which help pain and inflammation, but do so by gently buffering a range of inflammatory substances, rather than aggressively targeting one in particular. Now the teacher is calming the disruption by winning the whole class over.

Turmeric, Ginger, Fish or Linseed oils, Neem cream, Arnica cream, Chamomile and Nettle have all been used and approved by many people looking to control inflammatory conditions of one kind or another.
MOVING INTO THE HAYFEVER SEASON
Tissue swelling, sneezes, wheezing and red eyes are characteristic symptoms of hayfever. Initially, histamine is released from ‘mast cells’ or, in delayed reactions, from cells called ‘basophils’. Either way, histamine makes blood vessel walls really leaky, as it does during an infection, allowing the trigger allergen in. Pollen is harmless to many but causes an allergic reaction in others.

As warmer weather comes, heat or UV-induced urticaria can cause large, raised and reddened patches called ‘hives’ in many, while strong reactions to insect bites and stings are the main source of discomfort in others. A drop of lavender oil on the site of an insect bite or sting can take the fierceness out of it and nettle helps many control summer rashes.

For the general symptoms of hayfever,
Pollinosan tablets and nasal spray offer a variety of ingredients for the range of symptoms, while chamomile eye drops are a new option for those whose eyes become too itchy to leave alone. Anyone who says, ‘try not to rub them’ has never had hayfever!
INFLAMMATION
CAN YOU HAVE TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING?
Inflammation and your immune response are all wrapped up together, indivisible really. We tend to think of inflammation as the unacceptable side of injury or infection and often seek to dampen it but, without inflammation, your body wouldn’t know where to send immune cells and nor would they get into the area of distress anywhere near as easily. Inflammation serves as a pointer, a distress call, opens up blood vessels for increased blood flow and causes blood vessels to become leaky, so those immune cells can get into the tissues and do their thing.
ACUTE, CHRONIC, AUTOIMMUNE AND LOW-GRADE
Acute inflammation is that which comes and goes. It means you’re good at creating a reaction and then calming down when there’s nothing to worry about any more. However, some of us don’t calm down easily and remain agitated when we don’t need to be. As with unhealthy behaviour, too much anger is damaging, destructive and dangerous. We all know someone who’s like that on the outside! Similarly, inside the body, unregulated inflammation can destroy our own tissues, as with an autoimmune disease.

Some of us just simmer under the surface and that isn’t healthy either. It’s usually better to get it all out and be done with it; but some of us aren’t like that.
TRIGGERS
Aside from bacteria, viruses and injury, there are many other triggers for inflammation. High sugar or alcohol intake, inadequate sleep, and chemical irritants can be responsible for chronic and sometimes damaging inflammation in particular organs, or across the whole system. We can sometimes see symptoms worsen according to the level of stress we experience, or during hormonal changes.
Too much abdominal fat
High sugar diet
Dehydration
Stress and worry
Poor sleep
Excessive exercise
Too much alcohol
SIGNS OF CHRONIC INFLAMMATION
There are some quite serious diseases that are heavily associated with the tissue damage done by chronic inflammation. These include non-alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s, bowel disease and even cancer. However, there are more ‘everyday’ examples too, such as rheumatoid arthritis, diarrhoea, gout, mouth sores, eczema, psoriasis and allergies.
DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE CHANGES THAT HELP
Some of the substances that lead to inflammation are made from fats in the diet. Therefore, it makes sense to reduce the supply of those fats. Top of the list is one called Arachidonic Acid, which is found in meat and dairy products.
HERBS THAT HELP
Herbs that are regarded as beneficial for inflammation often work in a less targeted way than their medicinal counterparts. This doesn’t sound like good news, but it is. Modern drugs are so good at targeting particular inflammatory pathways that they can shut them down too well, raising the potential for side effects such as tummy bleeds and vascular damage. This is because some substances that create inflammation are protective to other parts of the body. It’s a bit like a teacher shouting aggressively at one child when the whole class is being disruptive.

Devil’s Claw and Arnica are two examples of herbs which help pain and inflammation, but do so by gently buffering a range of inflammatory substances, rather than aggressively targeting one in particular. Now the teacher is calming the disruption by winning the whole class over.

Turmeric, Ginger, Fish or Linseed oils, Neem cream, Arnica cream, Chamomile and Nettle have all been used and approved by many people looking to control inflammatory conditions of one kind or another.
MOVING INTO THE HAYFEVER SEASON
Tissue swelling, sneezes, wheezing and red eyes are characteristic symptoms of hayfever. Initially, histamine is released from ‘mast cells’ or, in delayed reactions, from cells called ‘basophils’. Either way, histamine makes blood vessel walls really leaky, as it does during an infection, allowing the trigger allergen in. Pollen is harmless to many but causes an allergic reaction in others.

As warmer weather comes, heat or UV-induced urticaria can cause large, raised and reddened patches called ‘hives’ in many, while strong reactions to insect bites and stings are the main source of discomfort in others. A drop of lavender oil on the site of an insect bite or sting can take the fierceness out of it and nettle helps many control summer rashes.

For the general symptoms of hayfever,
Pollinosan tablets and nasal spray offer a variety of ingredients for the range of symptoms, while chamomile eye drops are a new option for those whose eyes become too itchy to leave alone. Anyone who says, ‘try not to rub them’ has never had hayfever!
INFLAMMATION
CAN YOU HAVE TOO MUCH
OF A GOOD THING?
Inflammation and your immune response are all wrapped up together, indivisible really. We tend to think of inflammation as the unacceptable side of injury or infection and often seek to dampen it but, without inflammation, your body wouldn’t know where to send immune cells and nor would they get into the area of distress anywhere near as easily. Inflammation serves as a pointer, a distress call, opens up blood vessels for increased blood flow and causes blood vessels to become leaky, so those immune cells can get into the tissues and do their thing.
ACUTE, CHRONIC, AUTOIMMUNE AND
LOW-GRADE
Acute inflammation is that which comes and goes. It means you’re good at creating a reaction and then calming down when there’s nothing to worry about any more. However, some of us don’t calm down easily and remain agitated when we don’t need to be. As with unhealthy behaviour, too much anger is damaging, destructive and dangerous. We all know someone who’s like that on the outside! Similarly, inside the body, unregulated inflammation can destroy our own tissues, as with an autoimmune disease.

Some of us just simmer under the surface and that isn’t healthy either. It’s usually better to get it all out and be done with it; but some of us aren’t like that.
TRIGGERS
Aside from bacteria, viruses and injury, there are many other triggers for inflammation. High sugar or alcohol intake, inadequate sleep, and chemical irritants can be responsible for chronic and sometimes damaging inflammation in particular organs, or across the whole system. We can sometimes see symptoms worsen according to the level of stress we experience, or during hormonal changes.
Too much abdominal fat
High sugar diet
Dehydration
Stress and worry
Poor sleep
Excessive exercise
Too much alcohol
SIGNS OF CHRONIC INFLAMMATION
There are some quite serious diseases that are heavily associated with the tissue damage done by chronic inflammation. These include non-alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s, bowel disease and even cancer. However, there are more ‘everyday’ examples too, such as rheumatoid arthritis, diarrhoea, gout, mouth sores, eczema, psoriasis and allergies.
DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE CHANGES
THAT HELP
Some of the substances that lead to inflammation are made from fats in the diet. Therefore, it makes sense to reduce the supply of those fats. Top of the list is one called Arachidonic Acid, which is found in meat and dairy products.
HERBS THAT HELP
Herbs that are regarded as beneficial for inflammation often work in a less targeted way than their medicinal counterparts. This doesn’t sound like good news, but it is. Modern drugs are so good at targeting particular inflammatory pathways that they can shut them down too well, raising the potential for side effects such as tummy bleeds and vascular damage. This is because some substances that create inflammation are protective to other parts of the body. It’s a bit like a teacher shouting aggressively at one child when the whole class is being disruptive.

Devil’s Claw and Arnica are two examples of herbs which help pain and inflammation, but do so by gently buffering a range of inflammatory substances, rather than aggressively targeting one in particular. Now the teacher is calming the disruption by winning the whole class over.

Turmeric, Ginger, Fish or Linseed oils, Neem cream, Arnica cream, Chamomile and Nettle have all been used and approved by many people looking to control inflammatory conditions of one kind or another.
MOVING INTO THE HAYFEVER SEASON
Tissue swelling, sneezes, wheezing and red eyes are characteristic symptoms of hayfever. Initially, histamine is released from ‘mast cells’ or, in delayed reactions, from cells called ‘basophils’. Either way, histamine makes blood vessel walls really leaky, as it does during an infection, allowing the trigger allergen in. Pollen is harmless to many but causes an allergic reaction in others.

As warmer weather comes, heat or UV-induced urticaria can cause large, raised and reddened patches called ‘hives’ in many, while strong reactions to insect bites and stings are the main source of discomfort in others. A drop of lavender oil on the site of an insect bite or sting can take the fierceness out of it and nettle helps many control summer rashes.

For the general symptoms of hayfever,
Pollinosan tablets and nasal spray offer a variety of ingredients for the range of symptoms, while chamomile eye drops are a new option for those whose eyes become too itchy to leave alone. Anyone who says, ‘try not to rub them’ has never had hayfever!
INFLAMMATION
CAN YOU HAVE TOO
MUCH OF A GOOD THING?
Inflammation and your immune response are all wrapped up together, indivisible really. We tend to think of inflammation as the unacceptable side of injury or infection and often seek to dampen it but, without inflammation, your body wouldn’t know where to send immune cells and nor would they get into the area of distress anywhere near as easily. Inflammation serves as a pointer, a distress call, opens up blood vessels for increased blood flow and causes blood vessels to become leaky, so those immune cells can get into the tissues and do their thing.
ACUTE, CHRONIC, AUTOIMMUNE
AND LOW-GRADE
Acute inflammation is that which comes and goes. It means you’re good at creating a reaction and then calming down when there’s nothing to worry about any more. However, some of us don’t calm down easily and remain agitated when we don’t need to be. As with unhealthy behaviour, too much anger is damaging, destructive and dangerous. We all know someone who’s like that on the outside! Similarly, inside the body, unregulated inflammation can destroy our own tissues, as with an autoimmune disease.

Some of us just simmer under the surface and that isn’t healthy either. It’s usually better to get it all out and be done with it; but some of us aren’t like that.
TRIGGERS
Aside from bacteria, viruses and injury, there are many other triggers for inflammation. High sugar or alcohol intake, inadequate sleep, and chemical irritants can be responsible for chronic and sometimes damaging inflammation in particular organs, or across the whole system. We can sometimes see symptoms worsen according to the level of stress we experience, or during hormonal changes.
Too much abdominal fat
High sugar diet
Dehydration
Stress and worry
Poor sleep
Excessive exercise
Too much alcohol
SIGNS OF CHRONIC INFLAMMATION
There are some quite serious diseases that are heavily associated with the tissue damage done by chronic inflammation. These include non-alcoholic liver disease, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, depression, Alzheimer’s, bowel disease and even cancer. However, there are more ‘everyday’ examples too, such as rheumatoid arthritis, diarrhoea, gout, mouth sores, eczema, psoriasis and allergies.
DIETARY AND LIFESTYLE
CHANGES THAT HELP
Some of the substances that lead to inflammation are made from fats in the diet. Therefore, it makes sense to reduce the supply of those fats. Top of the list is one called Arachidonic Acid, which is found in meat and dairy products.
HERBS THAT HELP
Herbs that are regarded as beneficial for inflammation often work in a less targeted way than their medicinal counterparts. This doesn’t sound like good news, but it is. Modern drugs are so good at targeting particular inflammatory pathways that they can shut them down too well, raising the potential for side effects such as tummy bleeds and vascular damage. This is because some substances that create inflammation are protective to other parts of the body. It’s a bit like a teacher shouting aggressively at one child when the whole class is being disruptive.

Devil’s Claw and Arnica are two examples of herbs which help pain and inflammation, but do so by gently buffering a range of inflammatory substances, rather than aggressively targeting one in particular. Now the teacher is calming the disruption by winning the whole class over.

Turmeric, Ginger, Fish or Linseed oils, Neem cream, Arnica cream, Chamomile and Nettle have all been used and approved by many people looking to control inflammatory conditions of one kind or another.
MOVING INTO THE
HAYFEVER SEASON
Tissue swelling, sneezes, wheezing and red eyes are characteristic symptoms of hayfever. Initially, histamine is released from ‘mast cells’ or, in delayed reactions, from cells called ‘basophils’. Either way, histamine makes blood vessel walls really leaky, as it does during an infection, allowing the trigger allergen in. Pollen is harmless to many but causes an allergic reaction in others.

As warmer weather comes, heat or UV-induced urticaria can cause large, raised and reddened patches called ‘hives’ in many, while strong reactions to insect bites and stings are the main source of discomfort in others. A drop of lavender oil on the site of an insect bite or sting can take the fierceness out of it and nettle helps many control summer rashes.

For the general symptoms of hayfever,
Pollinosan tablets and nasal spray offer a variety of ingredients for the range of symptoms, while chamomile eye drops are a new option for those whose eyes become too itchy to leave alone. Anyone who says, ‘try not to rub them’ has never had hayfever!

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