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Your PMS Questions

YOUR PMS
    QUESTIONS
Why does my skin go barmy around my period?

It’s not that bad the rest of the month, but before my period I’ll get spots breaking out around my chin and jawline, which makes me feel really self-conscious.
Our skin is quite sensitive to hormonal fluctuations, and the week before our period is when our oestrogen is lowest (which can make our skin a little more easily irritated) and our progesterone is having more of an effect. Progesterone stimulates the production of sebum, which is a thick, oily substance that naturally lubricates the skin. That’s all very well, but when progesterone is more active, your skin may suffer from blocked pores due to the extra sebum – hello spots, pimples, blackheads, whiteheads… Not a great look, and made worse if there’s a lot of inflammation involved. Your skin can feel quite painful around swollen, inflamed spots.

This can all be made worse by the fact that low oestrogen can cause your bowel to be a little sluggish that pre-menstrual week, which in turn can trigger a few more spots around your chin and jawline.
To keep everything moving as normally as possible, check your water intake stays good, max out your veg intake, and don’t be tempted to eat more refined sugar – this just feeds bad bacteria which are not good for your skin or your bowel. Dried fruit provides a sweet alternative, which is also good for your gut.

Check your sleep schedule, as your body does plenty of cleaning up whilst you sleep, and a good night’s sleep is great for your skin.

You may not feel like much exercise, but get out into the fresh air every day, even if just for a
10-minute walk, as this is good for your skin too.

Be gentle with your cleansing routines – use natural products and simple strategies such as mild steaming, avoiding heavy, clogging oils or thick creams. You may find Silicol®Skin helpful during this skinflaring week.
The herb Echinacea can be helpful in creams, as it counters inflammation and mild infection.

The herb
Viola tricolor is also useful for those whose skin is very sensitive – use it internally to help cleanse and nourish the skin.
My cycle is usually fairly regular, so I know when my period is going to arrive. In the last few months it’s gone a bit crazy – heavier than usual and coming early, although once it was later. I’m confused! Is this a sign I’m heading into perimenopause? I’m 46.
Yes, a chaotic cycle is often the first sign of perimenopause, with periods taking us by surprise by being randomly shorter and/or longer than usual. This is due to the body having to work harder to achieve the right levels of sex hormones to trigger ovulation. We can end up firing off eggs more rapidly for a month or more, or lose enthusiasm and skip a few weeks. It’s highly disruptive for making plans! And if the ‘more-andheavier’ scenario kicks in for a while, we can end up being iron deficient (anaemic) from the blood loss.

Wait whilst we get on our soap boxes here.

It is
NOT OK to bleed heavily, especially if it’s happening frequently. Heavy bleeding is:
Menstrual bleeding that occurs more often than every 21 days.

Menstrual bleeding that lasts longer than 7 days (4 to 6 days is normal)

Blood loss of more than 80 mL (about 5.5 tablespoons) each menstrual cycle. Around 30 mL (2 tbsp) is more usual. If you are passing large clots or soaking a large pad per hour for 8 hours, your bleeding is officially considered heavy.
Everyone is different in terms of the blood loss they can sustain, and we are
keen to establish cycles that don’t involve you feeling drained, weak, or
light-headed with the heaviness of your bleed.

Ok, rant over.

Steps you can take to avoid becoming anaemic are to take a gentle iron tonic such as Floradix, ensure you are eating plenty of iron- rich foods (see list below), and take Agnus castus to restore a saner cycle, if shorter cycles seem to be sticking around. You can’t take Agnus castus if you are on hormonal contraceptives, so in that case try acupuncture, which can be very effective for hormonal imbalance.
Yummy iron sources: green leafy veg of all types, pistachios, pumpkin seeds, adzuki beans, soya
beans, sunflower seeds, millet, tofu, figs, apricots, dried apricots, black strap molasses, cashews, whole lentils, chickpeas, prunes, sardines, wild rice, kidney beans, blackcurrants, and beetroot.
YOUR PMS
    QUESTIONS
Why does my skin go barmy around my period?

It’s not that bad the rest of the month, but before my period I’ll get spots breaking out around my chin and jawline, which makes me feel really self-conscious.
Our skin is quite sensitive to hormonal fluctuations, and the week before our period is when our oestrogen is lowest (which can make our skin a little more easily irritated) and our progesterone is having more of an effect. Progesterone stimulates the production of sebum, which is a thick, oily substance that naturally lubricates the skin. That’s all very well, but when progesterone is more active, your skin may suffer from blocked pores due to the extra sebum – hello spots, pimples, blackheads, whiteheads… Not a great look, and made worse if there’s a lot of inflammation involved. Your skin can feel quite painful around swollen, inflamed spots.

This can all be made worse by the fact that low oestrogen can cause your bowel to be a little sluggish that pre-menstrual week, which in turn can trigger a few more spots around your chin and jawline.
To keep everything moving as normally as possible, check your water intake stays good, max out your veg intake, and don’t be tempted to eat more refined sugar – this just feeds bad bacteria which are not good for your skin or your bowel. Dried fruit provides a sweet alternative, which is also good for your gut.

Check your sleep schedule, as your body does plenty of cleaning up whilst you sleep, and a good night’s sleep is great for your skin.

You may not feel like much exercise, but get out into the fresh air every day, even if just for a 10-minute walk, as this is good for your skin too.

Be gentle with your cleansing routines – use natural products and simple strategies such as mild steaming, avoiding heavy, clogging oils or thick creams. You may find Silicol®Skin helpful during this skinflaring week.
The herb Echinacea can be helpful in creams, as it counters inflammation and mild infection.

The herb
Viola tricolor is also useful for those whose skin is very sensitive – use it internally to help cleanse and nourish the skin.
My cycle is usually fairly regular, so I know when my period is going to arrive. In the last few months it’s gone a bit crazy – heavier than usual and coming early, although once it was later. I’m confused! Is this a sign I’m heading into perimenopause? I’m 46.
Yes, a chaotic cycle is often the first sign of perimenopause, with periods taking us by surprise by being randomly shorter and/or longer than usual. This is due to the body having to work harder to achieve the right levels of sex hormones to trigger ovulation. We can end up firing off eggs more rapidly for a month or more, or lose enthusiasm and skip a few weeks. It’s highly disruptive for making plans! And if the ‘more-andheavier’ scenario kicks in for a while, we can end up being iron deficient (anaemic) from the blood loss.

Wait whilst we get on our soap boxes here.

It is
NOT OK to bleed heavily, especially if it’s happening frequently. Heavy bleeding is:
Menstrual bleeding that occurs more often than every 21 days.

Menstrual bleeding that lasts longer than 7 days (4 to 6 days is normal)

Blood loss of more than 80 mL (about 5.5 tablespoons) each menstrual cycle. Around 30 mL (2 tbsp) is more usual. If you are passing large clots or soaking a large pad per hour for 8 hours, your bleeding is officially considered heavy.
Everyone is different in terms of the blood loss they can sustain, and
we are keen to establish cycles that don’t involve you feeling drained,
weak, or light-headed with the heaviness of your bleed.

Ok, rant over.

Steps you can take to avoid becoming anaemic are to take a gentle iron tonic such as Floradix, ensure you are eating plenty of iron- rich foods (see list below), and take Agnus castus to restore a saner cycle, if shorter cycles seem to be sticking around. You can’t take Agnus castus if you are on hormonal contraceptives, so in that case try acupuncture, which can be very effective for hormonal imbalance.
Yummy iron sources: green leafy veg of all types, pistachios, pumpkin seeds, adzuki beans, soya beans, sunflower seeds, millet, tofu, figs, apricots, dried apricots, black strap molasses, cashews, whole lentils, chickpeas, prunes, sardines, wild rice, kidney beans, blackcurrants, and beetroot.
YOUR PMS
    QUESTIONS
Why does my skin go barmy around my period?

It’s not that bad the rest of the month, but before my period I’ll get spots breaking out around my chin and jawline, which makes me feel really self-conscious.
Our skin is quite sensitive to hormonal fluctuations, and the week before our period is when our oestrogen is lowest (which can make our skin a little more easily irritated) and our progesterone is having more of an effect. Progesterone stimulates the production of sebum, which is a thick, oily substance that naturally lubricates the skin. That’s all very well, but when progesterone is more active, your skin may suffer from blocked pores due to the extra sebum – hello spots, pimples, blackheads, whiteheads… Not a great look, and made worse if there’s a lot of inflammation involved. Your skin can feel quite painful around swollen, inflamed spots.

This can all be made worse by the fact that low oestrogen can cause your bowel to be a little sluggish that pre-menstrual week, which in turn can trigger a few more spots around your chin and jawline.
To keep everything moving as normally as possible, check your water intake stays good, max out your veg intake, and don’t be tempted to eat more refined sugar – this just feeds bad bacteria which are not good for your skin or your bowel. Dried fruit provides a sweet alternative, which is also good for your gut.

Check your sleep schedule, as your body does plenty of cleaning up whilst you sleep, and a good night’s sleep is great for your skin.

You may not feel like much exercise, but get out into the fresh air every day, even if just for a 10-minute walk, as this is good for your skin too.

Be gentle with your cleansing routines – use natural products and simple strategies such as mild steaming, avoiding heavy, clogging oils or thick creams. You may find Silicol®Skin helpful during this skinflaring week.
The herb Echinacea can be helpful in creams, as it counters inflammation and mild infection.

The herb
Viola tricolor is also useful for those whose skin is very sensitive – use it internally to help cleanse and nourish the skin.
My cycle is usually fairly regular, so I know when my period is going to arrive. In the last few months it’s gone a bit crazy – heavier than usual and coming early, although once it was later. I’m confused! Is this a sign I’m heading into perimenopause? I’m 46.
Yes, a chaotic cycle is often the first sign of perimenopause, with periods taking us by surprise by being randomly shorter and/or longer than usual. This is due to the body having to work harder to achieve the right levels of sex hormones to trigger ovulation. We can end up firing off eggs more rapidly for a month or more, or lose enthusiasm and skip a few weeks. It’s highly disruptive for making plans! And if the ‘more-andheavier’ scenario kicks in for a while, we can end up being iron deficient (anaemic) from the blood loss.

Wait whilst we get on our soap boxes here.

It is
NOT OK to bleed heavily, especially if it’s happening frequently. Heavy bleeding is:
Menstrual bleeding that occurs more often than every 21 days.

Menstrual bleeding that lasts longer than 7 days (4 to 6 days is normal)

Blood loss of more than 80 mL (about 5.5 tablespoons) each menstrual cycle. Around 30 mL (2 tbsp) is more usual. If you are passing large clots or soaking a large pad per hour for 8 hours, your bleeding is officially considered heavy.
Everyone is different in terms of the blood loss
they can sustain, and we are keen to establish
cycles that don’t involve you feeling drained,
weak, or light-headed with the heaviness of
your bleed.

Ok, rant over.

Steps you can take to avoid becoming anaemic are to take a gentle iron tonic such as Floradix, ensure you are eating plenty of iron- rich foods (see list below), and take Agnus castus to restore a saner cycle, if shorter cycles seem to be sticking around. You can’t take Agnus castus if you are on hormonal contraceptives, so in that case try acupuncture, which can be very effective for hormonal imbalance.
Yummy iron sources: green leafy veg of all types, pistachios, pumpkin seeds, adzuki beans, soya beans, sunflower seeds, millet, tofu, figs, apricots, dried apricots, black strap molasses, cashews, whole lentils, chickpeas, prunes, sardines, wild rice, kidney beans, blackcurrants, and beetroot.
YOUR PMS
    QUESTIONS
Why does my skin go barmy around my period?

It’s not that bad the rest of the month, but before my period I’ll get spots breaking out around my chin and jawline, which makes me feel really self-conscious.
Our skin is quite sensitive to hormonal fluctuations, and the week before our period is when our oestrogen is lowest (which can make our skin a little more easily irritated) and our progesterone is having more of an effect. Progesterone stimulates the production of sebum, which is a thick, oily substance that naturally lubricates the skin. That’s all very well, but when progesterone is more active, your skin may suffer from blocked pores due to the extra sebum – hello spots, pimples, blackheads, whiteheads… Not a great look, and made worse if there’s a lot of inflammation involved. Your skin can feel quite painful around swollen, inflamed spots.

This can all be made worse by the fact that low oestrogen can cause your bowel to be a little sluggish that pre-menstrual week, which in turn can trigger a few more spots around your chin and jawline.
To keep everything moving as normally as possible, check your water intake stays good, max out your veg intake, and don’t be tempted to eat more refined sugar – this just feeds bad bacteria which are not good for your skin or your bowel. Dried fruit provides a sweet alternative, which is also good for your gut.

Check your sleep schedule, as your body does plenty of cleaning up whilst you sleep, and a good night’s sleep is great for your skin.

You may not feel like much exercise, but get out into the fresh air every day, even if just for a 10-minute walk, as this is good for your skin too.

Be gentle with your cleansing routines – use natural products and simple strategies such as mild steaming, avoiding heavy, clogging oils or thick creams. You may find Silicol®Skin helpful during this skinflaring week.
The herb Echinacea can be helpful in creams, as it counters inflammation and mild infection.

The herb
Viola tricolor is also useful for those whose skin is very sensitive – use it internally to help
cleanse and nourish
the skin.
My cycle is usually fairly regular, so I know when my period is going to arrive. In the last few months it’s gone a bit crazy – heavier than usual and coming early, although once it was later. I’m confused! Is this a sign I’m heading into perimenopause? I’m 46.
Yes, a chaotic cycle is often the first sign of perimenopause, with periods taking us by surprise by being randomly shorter and/or longer than usual. This is due to the body having to work harder to achieve the right levels of sex hormones to trigger ovulation. We can end up firing off eggs more rapidly for a month or more, or lose enthusiasm and skip a few weeks. It’s highly disruptive for making plans! And if the ‘more-andheavier’ scenario kicks in for a while, we can end up being iron deficient (anaemic) from the blood loss.

Wait whilst we get on our soap boxes here.

It is
NOT OK to bleed heavily, especially if it’s happening frequently. Heavy bleeding is:
Menstrual bleeding that occurs more often than every 21 days.

Menstrual bleeding that lasts longer than 7 days (4 to 6 days
is normal)

Blood loss of more than 80 mL (about 5.5 tablespoons) each menstrual cycle. Around 30 mL (2 tbsp) is more usual. If you are passing large clots or soaking a large pad per hour for 8 hours, your bleeding is officially considered heavy.
Everyone is different in terms of the blood loss they can sustain, and we are keen to establish cycles that don’t involve you feeling drained, weak, or light-headed with the heaviness of
your bleed.

Ok, rant over.

Steps you can take to avoid becoming anaemic are to take a gentle iron tonic such as Floradix, ensure you are eating plenty of iron- rich foods (see list below), and take Agnus castus to restore a saner cycle, if shorter cycles seem to be sticking around. You can’t take Agnus castus if you are on hormonal contraceptives, so in that case try acupuncture, which can be very effective for hormonal imbalance.
Yummy iron sources: green leafy veg of all types, pistachios, pumpkin seeds, adzuki beans, soya beans, sunflower seeds, millet, tofu, figs, apricots, dried apricots, black strap molasses, cashews, whole lentils, chickpeas, prunes, sardines, wild rice, kidney beans, blackcurrants, and beetroot.

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Your PMS Questions